AAR - Advanced Handgun and IFAK - Independence Training - Independence Training - ShootersRealm.com: Shooting and Firearm Forums

Jump to content

AAR - Advanced Handgun and IFAK - Independence Training


  • You cannot reply to this topic
7 replies to this topic

#1
ragedracer

ragedracer

    Advanced Member

  • Founding Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
  • Real Name:Brice Dill
I had the opportunity to take a 2 day course with Glen this weekend. Day one was advanced handgun, day 2 was the IFAK course, with live fire elements incorporated.

Advanced Handgun:

We started out with fundamentals. Just making sure our shooting 'muscles' weren't rusty. Then the fun began. We ran iteration after iteration using only one hand. From drawing, to loading, to clearing malfunctions, we could ONLY use one hand. We started out with our shooting hand and then transitioned to our other shooting hand. Many instructors I've trained with refer to dominant hand and weak hand. We all know that shooting (and most everything we do) all starts in the brain. If, in your mind, you think "I'm going to use my weak hand", you've already set yourself up to not do as well, because you've told yourself it's weak. Does changing what you call it make a difference? I honestly don't know, but I do know that I'll take every advantage I can. This portion of the course really demonstrates that your gear is important. If you carry in such a way that you cannot draw your firearm with your other shooting hand, what are you going to do if you have something in your hand, you've been injured, you're fighting off an attacker, etc? One of the students found that the way his plate carrier was set up, it was nearly impossible to draw with his other hand. This portion really highlighted for me that I have some work to do with my other shooting hand. In a static environment, taking my time, I can get good hits. When the pressure's on, not so much. My trigger control needs a lot of work. We continued different exercises with both hands, but using only one hand at a time. He then showed us how well shooting from retention and from the center point of your body works. We then moved to drawing and shooting from different positions. Such as seated in a chair, laying on your stomach, your back, etc. We also trained on using cover, shooting from (and exiting) a vehicle. We also spent time not shooting. Does every confrontation require shooting? Nope. If you only train to shoot, that's the only tool in your tool box, and you might end up in trouble. Think before you shoot. Not every target needs to be shot.


IFAK

This is an *excellent* course. All of us who carry think about and train on how we're going to poke holes in people if the need arises. How many us think about or train on what to do if you or your loved ones end up with a hole poked in them? This class is not comprehensive first aid. It's first aid for controlling catastrophic bleeding and breathing issues. Basically keeping someone alive until EMS can arrive. We all know that a severed femoral artery is bad news, but I didn't how bad. If you sever your femoral artery, you can count your minutes left on this earth on one hand, unless you or someone else does something about it RIGHT NOW. You do not have time to wait for EMS. It doesn't even have to be a gunshot. An accident with a power tool, a kitchen knife, a broken glass, etc can all end your life in minutes. How would you feel watching your wife or child bleed to death while you had no idea what to do? This training gives you the opportunity to make a difference. You learn how to assess a scene, is it safe for you to approach, how to assess the casualty, how to treat them (and what to treat first), and how to control the others around the scene. After all of this, we had to opportunity to train with different scenarios. Putting all of that knowledge to use is easy when you're in a classroom setting. Not so much when you've had to shoot your way to a casualty, assess them while they're writhing in pain (or even unconscious!), when their clothes are in the way, and when there's blood all over the place. You owe it to yourself and your loved ones to take a course like this. Take it from Independence and I know you'll learn something, or take it from somewhere else, just take it. Know that when you are someone else is traumatically injured, you did everything you could, because you had the knowledge to do something.

As always, I leave at the end of day after training with Independence Training feeling more confident and knowledgeable. I also always learn that I'm not as prepared as I think I am. Get off your couch (or as another guy I know would say "Fuck your couch") and train. What's your excuse?

#2
TCB Firearms

TCB Firearms

    Advanced Member

  • ShootersRealm.com Vendor
  • PipPipPip
  • 1388 posts
  • LocationSan Tan Valley, AZ
  • Real Name:Jason Slisz
Great AAR, i had some questions about the course but was waiting for an AAR since i knew i wasn't going to make this one. My ems traning is waaaay out of date and i need to bring that up to par.
Would REALLY like a little more detail on the inclusion of shooting and EMS portions as this is where most of my questions were.

#3
ragedracer

ragedracer

    Advanced Member

  • Founding Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
  • Real Name:Brice Dill
I don't know that he incorporates the shooting portion into every class. This was more of a private course. There wasn't a lot of shooting, and it wasn't essential to the course, it was just a little bit of added stress. You would have to discuss with Glen whether your course would or not.

#4
TCB Firearms

TCB Firearms

    Advanced Member

  • ShootersRealm.com Vendor
  • PipPipPip
  • 1388 posts
  • LocationSan Tan Valley, AZ
  • Real Name:Jason Slisz
Not worried about it being in a future course...just interested on how it played out.
Was it just part of the scenario? EG- Shoot, move to cover, shoot, move to victim?

#5
ragedracer

ragedracer

    Advanced Member

  • Founding Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
  • Real Name:Brice Dill
Oh! We started in a vehicle. As if we'd come upon something in the desert or wherever. Engaged a target from inside the vehicle, exited, saw that there was another target, engaged that, then found the casualty. We did not "know" how the whole even transpired, or even if the casualty was a good guy, just that he was hurt and bleeding out. It was not a lot of shooting and the shooting wasn't really necessary, but it did add to the stress level.

#6
TCB Firearms

TCB Firearms

    Advanced Member

  • ShootersRealm.com Vendor
  • PipPipPip
  • 1388 posts
  • LocationSan Tan Valley, AZ
  • Real Name:Jason Slisz
Gotcha..thanks!

#7
azjogol

azjogol

    Advanced Member

  • Founding Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Real Name:John
Excellent job, Raged. I'm not nearly as articulate, but I would like to say that this course added so much more information to my list of possible scenarios and how I would deal with them. The seated work was one of the more important ones I think, in that how realistic is it going to be for you to stand up, spin around, and stop the threat before you are stopped? So being able to contort your body while still attaining quality hits is crucial. A definite eye opener. I know my neck was a little sore for a couple days, but what a miniscule price to pay for something that could prevent you from never feeling anything ever again.

As usual the class was taught in a manner where you find yourself wanting more and more and are a little bummed when it's over. For me, that class has me really fired up for getting out and working on the techniques/mechanics we learned.

Being that the class was so small I think it made it easier to really zero in on some of the skills needed. I would suggest to anyone that if you can afford a setting like we had, it is more than just worth every penny. I will gladly do that again and again.

As for the IFAK class, all I can say is I had no idea how such a basic kit can do so much, and at the same time I had no idea how ill prepared I would be in a situation requiring me to aide someone in a critical situation. We were encouraged to show our loved ones, but to be honest, for me, I don't feel I am anywhere fluent enough in just that basic kit. Sure, I can elaborate on applying the CAT and using celox, but the whole list of things you need to do, be aware of, well, it was something that had me pretty much in the "Deer in headlights" state. Again, this was something I enjoyed so much and got so much out of it, I want and need to do it again. It's hard to imagine a kit with so few items in it can do so much to help a person, when you know how to utilize those items.

My sincere thanks to Independence for allowing me to be a part of the two classes.

#8
ragedracer

ragedracer

    Advanced Member

  • Founding Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
  • Real Name:Brice Dill
Just a note: I ruined my AZCDL shirt on day one. :cool:

Clearing malfunctions with one hand, using my holster or mag pouch totally did it in. I was training from concealment in this course (something I've never done before, because it's harder - yeah, I'm dumb!) so my shirt was always over the holster or pouch. Kydex and Steel versus Cotton? Cotton loses every time.

So, if you're taking a class, wear a shirt you don't like too much.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

members, guests, anonymous users

ShootersRealm.com honors and supports the members of our United States Armed Forces. Thank you for everything you do, have done, or will do!