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- - - - - reloading 6.5 creedmoor press dies

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#1
Kevinjs1

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First off, I have never reloaded one round before this...

I have always used factory loads for pistols and other shooting I have done in the past but I would like to work up more accurate loads.

I want to begin reloading for precision rifle rounds and I need a new set of dies for the 6.5 Creedmoor that I just picked up. Do competition dies make that much of a difference for rifle loads? Who make the best ones?

I would like to load for .223, and .260 which I already have dies for as well as the 6.5. I will eventually load for 9mm as well.

I have a Dillion 450 press, Lyman tumbler, bullet puller and some other odds and ends so far, what else do I need to reload? Is a digital scale necessary, I have a beam scale? What calipers/gauges are needed?

I have a Lyman reloading book but I was hoping to skip some of the trial and error for the necessary parts.

Thanks,

Kevin

#2
Flash

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I want to begin reloading for precision rifle rounds and I need a new set of dies for the 6.5 Creedmoor that I just picked up. Do competition dies make that much of a difference for rifle loads? Who make the best ones?

That depends on how far you want to go with this thing. A lot of the avid benchresters use the competition dies because 0.005" difference in a 5 shot 100 yard group makes a huge difference to them. If that small a number makes a big difference to you, then go for the competition dies. What I do for precision is using a set of Redding dies that have both a neck sizer and a full length sizer. I also add a seater with a floating stem and a micrometer adjustment for seating depth. To give you an idea of what kind of groups I get, I'm averaging 5/8" 5 shot 100 yard groups, with a personal best of 3/8" for a 5 shot 100 yard group. This is with a .25-06 Remington 700 BDL Varmint Special gun with a heavy barrel. Anyway, we need a little more input on how much precision you want before we can get much more precise. Starting with new brass, all from the same lot, weighing every piece and setting aside the ones that deviate too much is a start. Using match grade bullets is a need if you want total precision. Trimming the brass to the same length each and every time you reload is a need. I uniform all the primer pockets, too, with a Sinclair uniformer and I also uniform all flash holes.

I would like to load for .223, and .260 which I already have dies for as well as the 6.5. I will eventually load for 9mm as well.

Obviously, any old dies will work well for the 9MM as it's not a precision type of thing normally. The same will probably be true for you for the .260. The .223 depends. If you're going to do precision loads, you've got to start off with a precision gun, with the barrel being the most critical and a few other things come into play also if you want ultimate competition grade accuracy.

I have a Dillion 450 press, Lyman tumbler, bullet puller and some other odds and ends so far, what else do I need to reload? Is a digital scale necessary, I have a beam scale? What calipers/gauges are needed?

A beam scale is fine and in many ways is better for the beginner as there's a lot of confusion on the net on exactly how a digital scale works, what its quirks are and how to get around them. If you ever want to really know, we can have a conversation as at one time in my career, I was the R&D Project Engineer for the scales division of Friden Alcatel, a leading manufacturer of Postal Scales and I did the electronic design and component specification and supervised the software engineers and the rest of the team. I worked there 3 years and designed and brought to market 6 different postal scales in use worldwide. I know exactly how they work and why.

I use a beam scale exclusively for precision reloads, and it's an old Ohaus 10-10. I don't reload +- 0.1 grain, I reload to exactly the same weight. This isn't really necessary IMO, but I do it out of habit. You're going to need a caliper to measure OAL with, and you can also use it for some other things. You'll need a way to clean your brass, a reloading manual or 2, a way to prime (I hand prime for precision and machine prime for other calibers. You don't need to hand prime for accuracy, but again, I'm anal.) You don't need a case gauge and I've never had one for precision reloading. I do use one for .223 and check about every 10th round to make sure my process isn't going south on me. You'll need some way to lube the rifle cases, either spray or a pad with lube. You'll need shellholders for any dies you don't buy from Lee as they don't come with the other brands. You should have a check weight or two to make sure your beam scale is set up and weighing properly. You'll need a case trimmer of some sort, and they vary from around $12.00 to around $450.00. Obviously, you need primers, bullets, cases and powder. There's more but that's all I'm coming up with at this time.

I have a Lyman reloading book but I was hoping to skip some of the trial and error for the necessary parts.

You don't need to do trial and error if you ask someone knowledgable before the doing part. Setting up the dies is critical as if you don't do that right, you're going to have all sorts of problems. Making absolutely sure you don't over or under charge a case is vital if you want to keep on having 8 fingers, 2 thumbs and 2 eyes. There are videos of this all over the net, so you can see how to set up dies and reload, which covers whether you're visual or verbal. Get a mentor if you can, someone who lives fairly near you and you can eliminate around 95% of the learning curve.

Thanks,

Kevin



#3
Kevinjs1

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I am definitely looking for maximum precision. I would like too shoot 1000+ yards or more if I can find a place to shoot.

I just took my 6.5 Creedmoor with a 26" Krieger varmint contour and shot a .24' group at 100 yards (outside edge to outside edge less the bullet diameter measured with a ruler). I was using Hornady 140 match ammo. I think I will try to work out my first load to something as close to the factory load as possible. Since this group was obtained in the first 60 shots of the rifles life I will probably have some load variations in the future.

I have a couple hundred Hornady factory once fired brass to start with a friend gave me.

The .260 has a Shilen match barrel on it as well but I will probably focus on putting the money into the 6.5 dies for now.

So I will need to pick up a caliper, some competition dies and some primers to start I think. I will work on getting some of this together and see how it goes. Any recommendations on caliper or dies?

Thanks for the info!

#4
Flash

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Take a look at the dies from Sinclair. Sinclair doesn't make dies, they sell precision reloading equipment and supplies. I've bought a lot of stuff from them over the years.

http://www.sinclairintl.com/

Edited by Flash, 27 November 2012 - 06:53 AM.


#5
hill60

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I love ready Larry's replies - I can always learn something! Great insight sir!

Bruno Shooter Supply up near Deer Valley Airport sells lots of precision-oriented reloading gear too - you might want to consider checking them out online or paying them a visit. (let's keep those $$$ in Arizona!) http://www.brunoshoo...ategory_Code=23

Creedmoor Shooting has stuff for the 6.5: http://www.creedmoorsports.com

#6
Flash

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One thing I thought I'd throw in for what it's worth.

My rifle is box stock, with the exception of a Leupold 6 x 18 scope on top.

I've never bought the really premium brass, like Lapua.

I've never used the match bullets, only varmint hunting bullets.

I've never used benchrest primers, only regular large rifle.

I've never used the premium dies, just the Redding 3 die set. F/L sizer, neck sizer and micrometer seater.

Obviously, if I'd done all the above, I could probably average groups around 3/8" easily. I'm just a varmint hunter though, and while I need accuracy, I don't need accuracy that's better than what I'm getting. And, since I mainly hunted ground squirrels at around 200+ yards, I can definitely hit homo sapiens out to at least 600~700 yards. I've done it on silhouettes every time at 300 meters in The Army, and that was with irons.

#7
428CJ

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First off, I have never reloaded one round before this...

I have always used factory loads for pistols and other shooting I have done in the past but I would like to work up more accurate loads.

I want to begin reloading for precision rifle rounds and I need a new set of dies for the 6.5 Creedmoor that I just picked up. Do competition dies make that much of a difference for rifle loads? Who make the best ones?

I would like to load for .223, and .260 which I already have dies for as well as the 6.5. I will eventually load for 9mm as well.

I have a Dillion 450 press, Lyman tumbler, bullet puller and some other odds and ends so far, what else do I need to reload? Is a digital scale necessary, I have a beam scale? What calipers/gauges are needed?

I have a Lyman reloading book but I was hoping to skip some of the trial and error for the necessary parts.

Thanks,

Kevin

I do play at 1,000 yards and here is the dies I use. For match rounds forsterproducts and Redding are good to go.
http://www.forsterproducts.com/store.asp?pid=24823&catid=19938





Bench Rest® Seater Dies


Ultra™ Micrometer Seater Dies







The Bench Rest® Seater Dies are the best straight line seating dies available. The bullet, case and seating system are all held in the same close fitting chamber for the entire seating operation.
UltraTM Micrometer Seater Dies utilize the Bench Rest® Seater Die, PLUS an ultra-precise micrometer adjustment feature for adjusting bullet seating depth.



#8
428CJ

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My rifle is box stock too.I did put a comp on it, because I'am a little old man. My reloads and it shoots under MOA at 1,000 yards. The paper target is about 51/4 " group. That's a 10" bull. Now the steel is a 5' bull.The rifle is Rem 700 P 300 Win Mag. I do use SMK bullets.For reloading, no outside distractions, go slow and be concise.Now with my setup, a real good shooter could do a lot better then I. The big trouble is the wind, you have to learn to read the wind.

#9
Kevinjs1

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Thanks for the input guys. I will probably run over to Bruno's for the specifics and to keep the $$$ in AZ. I had Brunos bed an action for me a couple of months ago and I am sure my money will compliment his establishment again :D





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