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Explain Exotic Animal Hunting?

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#1
Kilroy

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Not trying to start anything, just want to understand. What is the allure of exotic animal hunting? I've never wanted to shoot an elephant, zebra, or water buffalo, and I don't understand why people would want to. I don't hunt, but I think deer is delicious, so maybe someday I might go get one. Exotic animals? I don't think people are eating those, are they? Is it just for the mount? Why do people do it?

#2
TheSaint

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Some guys just like the thrill of the hunt and having a trophy on their wall. I don't, but I can see where some guys would. I know that on most safaris in Africa when an animal is taken the guides will make a meal for the hunters, but the rest of the meat is given to the local villages. it doesn't go to waste.

When I was in South Africa my friends took me to a restaurant called Carnivores, which was Brazilian-style barbecue with bush meat. I had crocodile, kudu, antelope, ostrich, and zebra (alongside more traditional meats and sausages). Apparently they would get elephant at times, when they had a cull up in Kruger, but they had none the week I was there. The zebra was delicious, I called that guy back half a dozen times.

#3
dauph

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I would think anyone that loves hunting is attracted to the idea of hunting an animal that is not here in the states and maybe also something that is considered "exotic". They get a thrill out of hunting big game that is not found in their country or in some places it is considered a no no.

Also there is a place in the valley that like to serve up exotic meats like lion. They even served rabbit during Easter.

#4
Flash

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While I've never hunted an exotic, I've given it a lot of thought and may yet go on a hunt of this type.

I've read Robert Ruark's books about Africa hunting, starting with "Horn Of The Hunter" and progressing through all of his works as well as Theodore Roosevelt's writings on it and some of Hemingway's.

Definitely heady stuff.

I'm sure a lot of the exotics are good eating even though I haven't had any because I've read about it.

OTOH, I have had Alligator when I was in Florida a few years back and Mrs. Flash and I both thought it was good.

It's amazing how many people almost gagged from just looking at it though. A lot of people can't stand the thought of any wild meat and when the wild meat could have eaten you, I guess it just magnifies their thoughts.

#5
TheSaint

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I remember that when we were at Carnivores one of the folks with us asked if they ever served lion, and they said they stopped serving it because nobody liked it. Apparently predators don't taste very good.

Down in the south part of South Africa, around George and Oudtshoorn, ostrich farming is a big industry. Every restaurant had ostrich burgers and steaks on the menu. It's really good, tastes more like beef than poultry, but still low in fat and cholesterol. I wish it was easier to get here.

#6
Flash

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Maybe Ostrich is easy to get here.

http://www.ajsfinefo...hers-corner.asp

Butcher's Corner



AJ's Butcher's Corner offers the most incredible meat selection in the state of Arizona. The finest center cuts of prime and choice beef, and all with preparation and serving advice from a staff of meat experts. Some AJ's locations also feature American Style Kobe Beef and dry aged beef. You'll also find a wide variety of prepared items ready for your oven or grill.


AJ's offers only all-natural chicken raised specifically to meet AJ's highest standards and to ensure the plumpest juiciest chicken is always available.


And if it's wild game or exotic meats you're seeking, AJ's is your source! Everything from lamb, venison and duck to ostrich and buffalo meat are available through the knowledgeable team at AJ's Butcher's Corner. Call today to see how AJ's can meet your needs!


Our butchers also have a variety of prepared items ready for your oven or grill, including Italian stuffed pork roast, stuffed flank steak and marinated shish kebabs. For those special holiday needs, we have filet mignon and prime rib roasts, rack of lamb, and crown pork roast.

#7
TheSaint

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Granted, Phoenix is a lot closer than Oudtshoorn, but it's not quite 'easy'. Maybe I'll take a trip to AJ's next time I'm down there, see what they have and how much they want for it.

#8
Flash

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While you're at AJ's, see if they have any Linguiça on hand.

The butcher there makes it in-house once a month and it's some of the best I've ever had.

The wife agrees with that statement and she's half Portugese and has eaten it all her life.

#9
Kilroy

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I would think anyone that loves hunting is attracted to the idea of hunting an animal that is not here in the states and maybe also something that is considered "exotic". They get a thrill out of hunting big game that is not found in their country or in some places it is considered a no no.

Also there is a place in the valley that like to serve up exotic meats like lion. They even served rabbit during Easter.


That's the part I don't understand. The only reason I would kill an animal is if I thought it would taste delicious. Alligator, ostrich, and rabbit taste good, so if the opportunity came up, I'd go bag one. Pretty sure exotic animal hunters aren't traveling halfway across the globe for a good meal though.

Do people get a thrill out of the stalk and the kill? Like I said, I've never gone hunting, I don't know. What's the deal?

#10
Flash

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There's a major thrill in hunting for me, and I've hunted ducks, geese, ptarmigan, grouse, pheasant, rabbit, moose, deer and mountain lion.

I may have left one or two out.

It's a large thrill and the biggest part of the thrill is pitting yourself and your outdoor skills against theirs, in their own element and not yours, and not in the shot itself as the shot is merely the culmination of the experience and the last thing you do before the work begins.

Hard to explain to someone who doesn't do it. Mrs. Flash couldn't understand it until I took her out Pheasant hunting and she bagged her first one. I thought I'd never be able to wipe the smile off her face. She became a confirmed hunter that day.

I think about the ultimate challenge for me would be buffalo in Africa or water buffalo in Australia. You screw up hunting one of those and it may well be the last thing you'll ever do.

I think perhaps an apt comparison would be trying to describe to a deaf person what rock and roll is and what it sounds like. There's just no good way to do it that I'm aware of.

#11
Kilroy

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So it's about the challenge? Trying something difficult and succeeding?

#12
Berd

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I think perhaps an apt comparison would be trying to describe to a deaf person what rock and roll is and what it sounds like. There's just no good way to do it that I'm aware of.


I like this, a lot. Pretty much sums up my feelings about trying to explain hunting in general to people that don't.

#13
Suzan Cooper

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Hunting (and I suppose that includes fishing) has nothing macho about it. People who hunt and fish do it because they love the countryside and in the vast majority of cases eat what they catch or shoot. My interest is fishing:

Fishing.

To catch a cod, when out at sea,
To strike, to play, then set it free.
To use such skill, is my one wish,
That I should be allowed to fish.

To walk along the river’s edge,
To fish the Mayfly or Green Sedge,
A June evening, when all is calm,
To hold a small trout in one’s palm.

To fish along the cold lake shore,
To catch a pike and pray for more,
And when one’s strength is truly spent,
To wander home, fully content.

To those who say that I ‘m a fool,
And say to fish, is something cruel,
I say to them, it’s nature’s way,
This man shall fish until death’s day.






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